About Elizabeth

On her blog, Guilty Kitchen, Elizabeth writes about the joys of local food, buying sustainable and feeling much too guilty after indulging in too many rich desserts.

Frozen Treats: Mango-Cilantro Popsicles

Beat the heat with our week-long series on simple frozen treats! Written by Elizabeth of Guilty Kitchen.

I‘ve often written in my personal blog and other places around the internet that I have a picky eater. This is not just any picky eater. This is a kid who will eat one thing one day and then flat out refuse to the very next moment. He won’t eat chocolate sometimes! For the longest time he refused to even try grilled cheese sandwiches and even now won’t so much as look at a ramekin of ketchup, going to the extreme of insisting it be removed from his plate if it makes it to our table alongside his sandwich and fries.

Desserts are not a given, and I’m often left completely boggled as to what to feed my son. I’d almost lost all hope of having a child who would follow in my food loving footsteps and then I had my daughter. At one year old, she’ll pretty much eat anything. She’ll at least give it a try and most likely swallow the first bite even if she isn’t too keen on it. My son? Still refuses to try anything new without coercion.

So when the weather started to heat up a bit, I thought I would try my hand at making popsicles. What better treat to give my kids than a healthy, tasty, homemade popsicle?

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Classic Comfort Food: Roasted Chicken and Root Vegetables

Written by Elizabeth Nyland of Guilty Kitchen

If there’s one thing that must be eaten at least weekly in our house it is this simple, rustic dish of roasted chicken and root vegetables. Why? You ask. Well for one, it usually leaves substantial enough leftovers for lunches to be made for whomever desires them. Another reason is because, contrary to its appearance, it’s amazingly simple and quick to make.

Getting home from work at a somewhat late afternoon time doesn’t necessarily mean you don’t have time to make a wonderfully satisfying dinner that will suit just about anybody’s needs. Roasted chicken, as per this recipe, can be done in no time at all and come out unfailingly moist and succulent on the inside while creating that crackly, perfectly crisp skin on the outside.

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A Classic Homemade Eggnog Recipe

Written by Elizabeth Nyland of Guilty Kitchen.

Fresh farm eggs: there’s nothing quite like them. What they offer more than anything else though, is food safety. Knowing where your eggs come from, what the chickens eat and how they live offers you great insight into their health status. Plus, the quality of farm fresh eggs just can’t be beat, and are a dream to work with, as my homemade mayonnaise demonstrates so well.

Eating raw eggs can be dangerous as they can become contaminated with salmonella and you would never know it. Mostly this is dangerous for immune compromised people, such as young children and the elderly or ill, but they can be dangerous for anyone.

Having fresher-than-fresh eggs that come from your own backyard chickens can reduce the risk of contamination as you are the one who has handled them from nest to kitchen, but it does not eliminate the possibility of contamination, it merely reduces the risk.

Not everyone has the opportunity to keep chickens, but it is easy to buy farm fresh eggs from roadside stands. An even better method would be to talk to the farmer and find out just how fresh those eggs are. Read more on ways to procure local fresh foods here.


All photos by Elizabeth Nyland

When making recipes that call for raw eggs, such as the eggnog recipe below, be sure to use the freshest eggs possible. Wash the shells before cracking to ensure nothing gets into the egg once they are removed from the shell.

Holiday Eggnog

Having eggnog during the holidays has become a tradition dating back to when I was in high school. The first time I tried, I made four quarts and the only ones drinking it were my father and me. Good thing we liked it so much. Ever since then I’ve tried to make it every year when we have people over.

This recipe is more than simple to make and keeps well as there is alcohol present (caution: don’t save it for more than a couple of days without alcohol).

Try this recipe out and make eggnog an annual tradition in your house! We find it pairs beautifully with Pumpkin Chiffon Pie, but you can be the judge of that!

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Preserving Autumn: Tomato Herb Sauce for Freezing

Written by Elizabeth of Guilty Kitchen.

When fall hits and you know you’ve got more tomatoes than anyone could ever eat fresh, no matter how many tomato and bocconcini salads, or BLTs, or tomato soup you serve, you know it’s time to think about canning or freezing. There is just always going to be an abundance of tomatoes when you grow your own.

Another thing in abundance at the end of the warmer weather is fresh herbs, waiting to be used up before the weather turns bleak and gray. What better way to combine tomatoes and herbs than making your own tomato sauce to freeze for later use in the doldrums of winter when you could really use that fresh, vibrant taste of homegrown? [Read more…]

More than Mirepoix: Roasted Carrot and Cilantro Soup

September. These are the last fleeting days of summer and the return of the crispness of autumn, not to mention the kids to school!

For me, September brings to mind scarves and warm coats, piles of newly yellowed leaves, wood smoke hanging in the air like unspoken words and an end to the bounty of summer harvests; now is the time to be canning, freezing and otherwise preserving all of the best summer has to offer.

Not to be outdone by it’s summer seasonal counterpart though, there is much that is in season in September, including apples, pears, potatoes, peppers, onions, garlic, figs and of course, carrots.

Uncomplicated and easy to prepare, carrots are something everyone uses but don’t often think of as much of a star ingredient. They are usually thought of as a side dish or a background flavor, are always at the center of mirepoix (the aromatics forming the base of most soups, stocks and sauces, at least in French cuisine), and are often served raw on top of salads.

What many people don’t realize, however, is that carrots have a sweet flavor profile and when roasted, their natural sugars are enhanced dramatically giving them a caramelized, deep flavor and a wonderful meaty texture when made into purées for soups, such as this one. [Read more…]