3 Simple Ways to Store Online Recipes

I love poring through cookbooks, especially when they have color photos and richly descriptive text.

But when it comes down to it, about 75 percent of the recipes I use on a regular basis come from the Internet. Betty Crockers of the post-modern world have a plethora of recipes at their disposal, but it’s easily overwhelming.

The Internet is a huge place, so how do you organize all the recipes you want to keep? There are almost as many systems to organizing URLs as there are URLs themselves, so there’s no one right way. But I like using systems I’m using anyway, instead of subscribing to a unique program solely for recipes or menu planning.

Whatever you use, the point is to keep it simple, easy to use, and helpful when you need that exact recipe in that precise moment. It’s such a pain to know you have a recipe somewhere, but aren’t sure where you saved it.

In my opinion, here are some of the most helpful ways to store recipes from the Internet.

1. Delicious.com

I love Delicious. It’s one of the oldest bookmarking sites around, and its simple interface would almost have you believe it’s too archaic to use. But its simplicity is what makes it so great. There are no bells and whistles — just simple Internet bookmarking, with tags, the ability to share with others, and tools to help bundle what you find.

Let me explain how I use Delicious as my online cookbook. When I find a recipe I want to save, I click on the Delicious icon I have on my Firefox toolbar (Delicious bookmarks is an add-on). A window pops up, where I retype the recipe name in a way that makes sense to me.

Then I add tags. At the very least, I use the tag recipes, but then I also include any other tags that might help me find the recipe — chicken, pasta, and maindish, for example.

If I want to send the recipe to anyone else on Delicious, I toggle the “send” tab and select from my network of people. Sometimes I send this to my husband’s Delicious account, since he shares the cooking duties in our household.

I save, and that’s it. The recipe is now in my online cookbook.

Now, when I want to find a recipe in my cookbook, I keep things as simple as possible in my Delicious account by using its bundling feature. In the right sidebar of Delicious, go to the “Options” drop-down menu and select “Manage tag bundles.” Here, you can create a bundle — and in this case, mine is called “recipebox.”

You can select all the tags you want included in this bundle. Once you’re done, save it, and that’s it. You now have a bundle of recipes saved in one place, easily searchable by tags.

2. Gmail

I personally haven’t done this, but I appreciate this idea because it keeps the inboxes of your life down to the bare minimum. If you use Gmail for your email correspondence anyway, you can use Gmail’s brilliant labeling and archiving system to keep track of your recipes.

Create a new Gmail address, and allow your main Gmail account to retrieve this new address. Then use the settings feature in your main Gmail to have this new address skip the inbox all together and go straight to archives. This way, you don’t even see your recipes in your inbox — you simply click on the label “recipes” on the left, and all your recipes will appear, in the form of emails sent by you, to you.

So when you find a recipe you want to save, email it to yourself. Email it to “tshsrecipes [at] gmail [dot] com,” for example (not a real email address, so don’t even try it…), and use a consistent format most helpful to you. Type the name of the recipe in the subject line, and include the link in the email body, perhaps.

Then when you click on this email’s label in the left-hand side of your Gmail inbox, you’ll see all your recipes, archives and waiting for you. You can then take it a step further and add labels to customize your recipe search.

3. Good ol’ paper and printer


Photo by Jessica Spengler

Yep, in this age, when I’m in front of the stove stirring a roux while steaming asparagus, I still ultimately prefer an analog cookbook. When it’s time to try a new recipe I’ve stored in Delicious, I print it.

After the meal, if my family decides it’s save-worthy, I place it in a clear sleeve and toss it in my recipe binder. In this binder, I’ve got tabbed files with your usual categories — breakfast, side dishes, desserts, and the like.  It’s as simple as it gets.

I honestly use this binder more than any other full-color, glossy cookbook sitting on my shelf. I only save the recipes we love, so I know each one is a winner. And the clear sleeve means I can tack it to my magnetic strip next to the stove, and all the splatters just need a quick wipe when I’m done.

So for me, a combination of a digital recipe box and an analog cookbook of surefire recipes works best for me. There are plenty of options out on the Internet, but as usual, simple is usually best.

How about you — how do you store your online recipes?

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Comments

  1. I copy and print.
    Mostly because i hate having a laptop on the kitchen bench – i prefer to work from paper recipe – I can also easily give to friends/family and make handwritten notes of any tweaks

  2. oohh…I never thought about this other than printing and putting the page into a plastic sleeve in a folder! BUT… the delicious method is smart idea. thanks! cheers
    kari
    make my day’s last post: Olive Oil Chocolate Mousse &amp Adapt-A-Bowls

  3. wow this goes to show how different people think. I would have never thought of that :)

    thanks.

  4. cookmarked.com is a great free online tool for organizing and sharing recipes. plenty of other features too!

  5. I use The Living Cookbook. I really didn’t want to pay for anything but the large amount of food blog recipes that i have bookmarked got out of hand. With this program you can cut and paste the recipe into the capture part of the program and highlight the parts you want to keep and it creates a recipe for you and stores it in the program. My favorite part is that i can search through all of the recipes with the search bar.. which was the issue with the print and put in a binder way.

  6. Wow, clear sleeve and magnetic strip! I have food splattered all over my printed recipes. (I think it adds character though. . .)

    I just have a plain old “recipes” bookmark.

    Oh, actually, what I have been doing is cut and pasting recipes into a sticky note on my desktop. Instead of printing I just consult my laptop. When the sticky gets too full (I just paste each one above the last), I save it as a file in my documents. Certainly will not be easy to find a particular recipe though. . .

  7. Take a look at http://www.cookmarkit.com. It’s a new social bookmarking site that focuses on recipes. Really easy to follow your friends and see what they’re cooking. Happy cooking everyone!

  8. I just started to put mine on google docs. I can sort them in folders and they are accessible from any computer. It is also easy to copy and paste new recipes and share with others.

  9. I print mine as PDF that I store in a giant “Food” folder on my computer, once I try it and if it gets approved I write it down in my beloved moleskine cookbook. The only issue with this is that I hoard recipe and at the last count I was at almost 3000 recipe that I collected online (that would probably kill an entire forest if I decided to print them :) )

  10. You can use a site like http://www.monkeylicious.com. You can add existing recipes to your own collection or add your own recipes. Also can share between users etc…

  11. You can use a site like http://www.monkeylicious.com. You can add existing recipes to your own collection or add your own recipes. Also can share between users etc…

  12. I have a recipes folder I keep on a USB drive that’s always with me. It has several subfolders of different categories. I have them all saved either as pictures where I’ve scanned ones I clipped or as plain old notepad documents that I have copied and pasted online recipes in. When I want to make one I print it and if we like it I have a spiral bound cookbook that was bought for me to record favorite recipes in and I write it in it. This way if a friend or someone wants a recipe I’ve made I can just copy and paste it in an email to them or print it off for them from pretty much any computer because I always have my flash drive. I can also use windows search feature to find the one I want. I have a folder exclusively for “Tried & True” recipes. If I try one and we don’t like it, it gets deleted from the computer.

  13. I actually just use Pinterest now :) Very easy to tag websites and put it under a “Foodie” board. Only downside is that I’m stumped if the link gets broken or the website changes.

  14. I use to use Pinterest but I now use Pasplore.com and LOVE it! It is by far the best tool I have found for saving, editing, sharing, organizing, and even creating recipes. And the best part is I never have to worry about a broken link =). http://pasplore.com

  15. I’m a bit biased because it’s my site, but I use http://www.myonlinecookbook.com for organizing recipes.

  16. If you haven’t tried out One tsp., it’s a simple and straightforward way to store your own recipe collection online. You can add recipes manually, or use a bookmarklet (“the Recipe Clipper”) to automatically copy recipes from other web sites.

    It’s free to use for up to 150 recipes, and then there’s a $5/year fee.

    https://onetsp.com

  17. Evernote! Snap a picture, save, clip, cut & paste, or share to Evernote (free version or paid). You can even take a picture of your cookbooks’s index pages, and Evernote will OCR scan it, so that anytime you search your Evernote files for something like “pie”, any recipe in those cookbook index pics will also show up in the results. So easy to organize, and I can “share” my entire recipe collection with my daughters easily by inviting them.

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